The Mansuit in review: Poetry can be cool, too

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The Mansuit in review: Poetry can be cool, too

Joe Morrison, Opinion Writer

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It is a scientific fact that people do not read enough modern poetry. When was the last time you heard of a book of poetry on the New York Times bestseller list? What about a poem being adapted into a movie? Where is the J.K. Rowling of modern poetry, and why aren’t we hanging on her every word?
That’s an article for another time. What I’m really here to tell you is that there is a poetry book out there that is worthy of your time.  It is called “The Man Suit,” and it is an excellent book of surreal poetry. Highlights include a poem about Italian opera singing lumberjacks with trees growing inside them and a lengthy poem concerning a black telephone and a white telephone. The poems do not follow any set structure and trying to impose traditional definitions on “The Man Suit” is pointless. Like the best books, “The Man Suit” is a book that cold-shocks you into its bizarre world and becomes, by turns, more insightful and more hilarious as you acclimate to it. It’s a window into the intriguing mind of poet Zachary Schomburg and it’s absolutely criminal that more people haven’t read it. The book reads a bit like a waking dream feels. Schomburg’s worlds are vivid and wonderful to explore.
Therefore, it is my pleasure to introduce to you a book that is very short, very good and very deserving of your complete attention.

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